My Blog

Posts for: September, 2018

By Gary W. Machiko, DMD
September 24, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental ImplantsFor a complete smile, see Pittsburgh dentist, Dr. Gary Machiko, about dental implants--actual artificial teeth in every sense of the term. Set directly into the jaw bone, dental implants close gaps, improve bone structure and give you the oral function so close to real teeth it's amazing. Get a second chance at a great smile.

Becoming gap-free

Self-confidence suffers when you lose teeth. Your remaining teeth migrate toward the empty spaces, and gum tissue and supporting bone degrade almost immediately, changing how your face looks. Sure, traditional bridges and dentures work well as far as they go; however, they slip, change speech, create sore spots, wear down neighboring teeth and more. Plus, they do not exercise the jaw bone.

Alternatively, dental implants from Dr. Machiko in Pittsburgh improve jaw bone structure through osseointegration. After implant insertion, the jaw bone adheres to the titanium metal screw, creating a bond which improves with time. Osseointegration is exclusive to dental implants. No other tooth replacement claims this superior strength and natural functionality.

Are implants right for you?

If you have enough bone in your jaw and your overall health is good, you probably qualify for implants. To confirm this, Dr. Machiko will do a complete examination, check your medical history and do some digital X-rays and three- dimensional imaging. If you lack sufficient bone, you may be eligible for bone grafting procedures which Dr. Machiko can do right in the office.

Dr. Machiko and his professional team also execute every other phase of implant placement from the insertion of the device to restoration with an alloy post and custom-crafted porcelain crown. Additionally, if you are missing several or even all of your teeth, you may qualify for implant-supported "teeth in a day", bridgework, or "All-on-4" dentures. All of these tooth replacements owe their durability and stability to state-of-the-art dental implants and Dr. Machiko's extensive expertise.

Implants change it all

From how you look, to how you eat and speak and even to how you take care of your teeth, dental implants revolutionize dental prosthetics patient by patient by patient. Remember, dental implants only require twice daily brushing and once a day flossing to stay healthy and plaque-free. However, if you smoke, you do increase the chances of implant failure quite dramatically. So take this opportunity to begin a smoking cessation program through your primary care physician.

Are you ready for a gap-free smile?

The American Academy of Implant Dentistry says that about three million people in the United States have at least one dental implant. That number grows annually, too. Would you like to be one of the many happy implant patients Dr. Machiko has helped? Then, contact his office in Pittsburgh, PA to arrange your own implant consultation. Call today: (412) 367-1319.


By Gary W. Machiko, DMD
September 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   gum disease  
StopGumDiseaseBeforeitGetsStartedwithDailyOralHygiene

While tooth decay seems to get most of the “media attention,” there’s another oral infection just as common and destructive: periodontal (gum) disease. In fact, nearly half of adults over 30 have some form of it.

And like tooth decay, it begins with bacteria: while most are benign or even beneficial, a few strains of these micro-organisms can cause gum disease. They thrive and multiply in a thin, sticky film of food particles on tooth surfaces called plaque. Though not always apparent early on, you may notice symptoms like swollen, reddened or bleeding gums.

The real threat, though, is that untreated gum disease will advance deeper below the gum line, infecting the connective gum tissues, tooth roots and supporting bone. If it’s not stopped, affected teeth can lose support from these structures and become loose or out of position. Ultimately, you could lose them.

We can stop this disease by removing accumulated plaque and calculus (calcified plaque, also known as tartar) from the teeth, which continues to feed the infection. To reach plaque deposits deep below the gum line, we may need to surgically access them through the gums. Even without surgery, it may still take several cleaning sessions to remove all of the plaque and calculus found.

These treatments are effective for stopping gum disease and allowing the gums to heal. But there’s a better way: preventing gum disease before it begins through daily oral hygiene. In most cases, plaque builds up due to a lack of brushing and flossing. It takes only a few days without practicing these important hygiene tasks for early gingivitis to set in.

You should also visit the dentist at least twice a year for professional cleanings and checkups. A dental cleaning removes plaque and calculus from difficult to reach places. Your dentist also uses the visit to evaluate how well you’re doing with your hygiene efforts, and offer advice on how you can improve.

Like tooth decay, gum disease can rob you of your dental health. But it can be stopped—both you and your dentist can keep this infection from ruining your smile.

If you would like more information on preventing and treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


FindoutWhatKindofToothStainingyouHaveBeforeSeekingaSolution

Stained teeth can be embarrassing — so much so you may even hesitate to smile. Before you seek out a whitening solution, though, there are a few things you need to know about tooth staining.

Tooth staining is more complex than you might think. There are actually two types: extrinsic, staining from foods and other substances of the outer surface of the enamel; and intrinsic, discoloration deep within a tooth that affects their outward appearance. The latter staining has a number of causes, including the type of dental materials used to fill a tooth, a history of trauma or the use of the antibiotic tetracycline during early tooth development.

There are some noticeable differences between the two types, although an examination is usually necessary to determine which you have. Extrinsic staining tends to be brown, black, or gray, or occasionally green, orange or yellow. Intrinsic staining can be red, pink or, if caused by tetracycline and fluoresced under ultraviolet light, yellow. If only one tooth is discolored it’s most likely intrinsic due to decay in the tooth pulp.

What can be done also depends on which type. Extrinsic staining can be modified through whitening, with either an office application or a home kit (there are differences, so you should consult with us before you decide). It may also be essential to modify your diet by restricting foods and beverages (coffee, wine or tea) known to cause staining and by eliminating tobacco use. You should also practice daily hygiene, including brushing with a toothpaste designed to diminish staining, and regular office cleaning and polishing.

Intrinsic staining can’t be addressed by these methods. Instead, you may need to undergo a procedure where we enter the interior of the tooth and insert a bleaching agent. If this isn’t an option, you can also choose a cosmetic restoration such as a porcelain veneer or crown that will cover the tooth to better match the color of your other teeth.

Dealing with stained teeth begins with a visit to our office to determine what type of discoloration you have and to learn your options. But regardless of what type you have, there is a way to a brighter smile.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatments of tooth staining, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Staining.”